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Other Books By Roz Chast

The Alphabet from A to Y With Bonus Letter Z! (2007)
The acclaimed entertainer and bestselling author Steve Martin and the wildly clever New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast team up in a weird, wonderful excursion through the alphabet. (Preschool - Kindergarten)

Around the Clock (2015)
Do you ever wonder what your friends, enemies, brothers, sisters, and children are doing in the hours when you’re not there? This kooky twenty-four-hour tour of a day in the life of twenty-three different children will reveal answers from the absurd…to the hilarious…to the absurdly hilarious! (Kindergarten - 3rd grade)

Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York (2017)
Told through Roz Chast’s singularly zany, laugh-out-loud, touching, and true cartoons, Going Into Town is part New York stories (the "overheard and overseen" of the island borough), part personal and practical guide to walking, talking, renting, and venting--an irresistible, one-of-a-kind love letter to the city.

Marco Goes to School (2012)
Marco is the busiest bird, and it’s time he goes to school! There is so much to do at school, from lessons to lunch to building a block tower to the moon! But Marco soon learns that his plans for the day may be just a bit too ambitious. Luckily, school has one extra surprise for him—and that’s a new friend! Acclaimed cartoonist Roz Chast proves that it’s not getting to the moon that counts—it’s the friends we make along the way. (Preschool - 3rd grade)

The Party, After You Left (2014)
These cartoons, which originally appeared in The New Yorker, Scientific American, Redbook, and other publications, constitute a spot-on record of our increasingly absurd existence. The book is a powerful reminder of how lucky we are to have Roz Chast among us to tackle some of the toughest themes of the times with uproarious humor: genetically altered mice, birthday parties from hell, and comfort drinks in the age of insecurity.

Theories of Everything: Selected, Collected, and Health-Inspected Cartoons, 1978-2006 (2008)
This wonderfully comprehensive collection spanning nearly three decades and arranged chronologically-and drawn from the pages of magazines including Scientific American and Redbook as well as The New Yorker-brings together, for the first time, the very best of Roz Chast, whom O Magazine called "the wryest pen since Dorothy Parker's."

Too Busy Marco (2011)
It's time for bed again, and Marco, a small red bird who lives with his (human) mother and father, simply has too much to do! He's got masterpieces to paint, underwater inventions to create, halfpipes to skate -- or better yet, inventions to create so that he can paint underwater while skateboarding at a world-class level! How can it possibly all get done? When one idea builds on top of another, and every object he encounters just screams inspiration, why would Marco ever want to put on his pajamas and brush his beak? With humor and a great deal of energy, this delightful new character from acclaimed illustrator Roz Chast will rev kids up and wear them out--just in time for bed. (Kindergarten - Grade 3)

What I Hate, From A to Z (2011)
With never-before-published, full-page cartoons for every letter, and supplemental text to make sure the proper fear is instilled in every heart, Chast's alphabetical compendium will resonate with anyone well-versed in the art of avoidance- and make an instructive gift for anyone who might be approaching life with unhealthy unconcern.

 

Other Graphic Memoirs

Blankets by Craig Thompson (2015)
This groundbreaking graphic novel, winner of two Eisner and three Harvey Awards, is an eloquent portrait of adolescent yearning; first love (and first heartache); faith in crisis; and the process of moving beyond all of that. Beautifully rendered in pen and ink, Thompson has created a love story that lasts.

Displacement by Lucy Knisley (2015)
In this installment of her graphic travelogue series, Knisley volunteers to watch over her ailing grandparents on a cruise. In a book that is part graphic memoir, part travelogue, and part family history, Knisley not only tries to connect with her grandparents, but to reconcile their younger and older selves. She is aided in her quest by her grandfather's WWII memoir, which is excerpted. Readers will identify with Knisley's frustration, her fears, her compassion, and her attempts to come to terms with mortality, as she copes with the stress of travel complicated by her grandparent's frailty.

Fun Home by Allison Bechdel (2007)
Meet Alison's father, a historic preservation expert and obsessive restorer of the family's Victorian house, a third-generation funeral home director, a high school English teacher, an icily distant parent, and a closeted homosexual who, as it turns out, is involved with male students and a family babysitter. Through narrative that is alternately heartbreaking and fiercely funny, we are drawn into a daughter's complex yearning for her father. And yet, apart from assigned stints dusting caskets at the family-owned 'fun home,' as Alison and her brothers call it, the relationship achieves its most intimate expression through the shared code of books.

Hospital Suite by John Porcellino (2014)
In 1997, John began to have severe stomach pain. He soon found out he needed emergency surgery to remove a benign tumor from his small intestine. In the wake of the surgery, he had numerous health complications that led to a flare-up of his preexisting tendencies toward anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The Hospital Suite is Porcellino's response to these experiences. His gift for spare yet eloquent candor makes this book an intimate portrayal of one person's experiences that is also intensely relatable. The Hospital Suite makes his struggles with the medical system and its consequences for his mental health accessible and engaging.

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir by Ellen Forney (2012)
Cartoonist Ellen Forney explores the relationship between “crazy” and “creative” in this graphic memoir of her bipolar disorder, woven with stories of famous bipolar artists and writers. Darkly funny and intensely personal, Forney’s memoir provides a visceral glimpse into the effects of a mood disorder on an artist’s work, as she shares her own story through bold black-and-white images and evocative prose.

March trilogy (2013-2016)
Discover the inside story of the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of one of its most iconic figures, Congressman John Lewis. March is the award-winning, #1 bestselling graphic novel trilogy recounting his life in the movement, co-written with Andrew Aydin and drawn by Nate Powell.

Maus: A Survivor's Tale by Art Spiegelman (1986)
A brutally moving work of art—widely hailed as the greatest graphic novel ever written—Maus recounts the chilling experiences of the author’s father during the Holocaust, with Jews drawn as wide-eyed mice and Nazis as menacing cats. Maus is a haunting tale within a tale, weaving the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father into an astonishing retelling of one of history's most unspeakable tragedies. It is an unforgettable story of survival and a disarming look at the legacy of trauma.

Rosalie Lightning by Tom Hart (2016)
Rosalie Lightning is Eisner-nominated cartoonist Tom Hart's touching and beautiful graphic memoir about the untimely death of his young daughter, Rosalie. His heart-breaking and emotional illustrations strike readers to the core, and take them along his family's journey through loss. Hart uses the graphic form to articulate his and his wife's on-going search for meaning in the aftermath of Rosalie's death, exploring themes of grief, hopelessness, rebirth, and eventually finding hope again. Tom Hart is also the author of The Art of the Graphic Memoir (2018).

Special Exits by Joyce Farmer (2010)
Special Exits chronicles the decline of Lara (Farmer’s stand-in)’s elderly parents (Lars and Rachel)’s health. Set in southern Los Angeles, backgrounds and props are lovingly detailed: these objects serve as memory triggers for Lars and Rachel, even as they eventually overwhelm them and their home, which the couple is loathe to leave. Special Exits is laid out in an eight-panel grid, which creates a leisurely storytelling pace that not only helps to convey the slow, inexorable decline in Lars’ and Rachel’s health, but perfectly captures the timbre of the exchanges between a long-married couple: the affectionate bickering; their gallows humor; and their querulousness as their bodies break down.

Tangles: A Story About Alzheimer's, My Mother and Me by Sarah Leavitt (2012)
In this powerful memoir Sarah Leavitt reveals how Alzheimer’s disease transformed her mother, Midge, and her family forever. Midge, a Harvard educated intellectual, struggles to comprehend the simplest words; Sarah’s father, Rob, slowly adapts to his new role as full-time caretaker, but still finds time for wordplay and poetry with his wife; Sarah and her sister Hannah argue, laugh, and grieve together as they join forces to help Midge. Tangles confronts the complexity of Alzheimer’s disease, and ultimately releases a knot of memories and dreams to reveal a bond between a mother and a daughter that will never come apart.